ESIL Interest Group History of International Law

ESIL Interest Group History of International Law

Thursday 18 July 2024

BOOK: Anthony LANG & Antjie WIENER (eds.), "Handbook on Global Constitutionalism" (2nd edition, Edward Elgar, 2024)

Source: Elgar

 Description:

This thoroughly revised Handbook presents an up-to-date political and philosophical history of global constitutionalism. By exploring the constitutional-like qualities of international affairs, it provides key insights into the evolving world order.

Through a sustained examination of current events, as well as an acknowledgement of the significance of early constitutional history, this erudite Handbook brings together contributions from world-leading academics. New chapters offer timely commentaries on important developments in methodology such as postcolonial and feminist approaches. By providing additional scope for analysis, this updated edition further emphasises the central message of the first: that the global order cannot be understood without a clear comprehension of constitutional theory.

The Handbook on Global Constitutionalism will act as an essential resource for scholars and academics of law, politics and human rights. Due to its comprehensive examination of vital concepts such as legal theory, it will additionally be beneficial for practitioners and policy makers.

Table of contents:

Preface and acknowledgments xvii

1 Introduction to the Handbook on Global Constitutionalism: protecting
rights and democracy while binding power 1
Anthony F. Lang, Jr. and Antje Wiener

PART I HISTORICAL ANTECEDENTS
2 Global constitutionalism: the ancient worlds 24
Jill Harries
3 Medieval constitutionalism 36
Francis Oakley
4 Global constitutionalism in the early modern period: the role of
empires, treaties and natural law 47
Martine van Ittersum
5 The Enlightenment and global constitutionalism 60
Chris Thornhill
6 Modern historical antecedents of global constitutionalism in theoretical
perspective 77
Michel Rosenfeld

PART II POLITICAL AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORIES
7 Cosmopolitanism and global constitutionalism 90
Garrett Wallace Brown
8 Liberal theory 102
Iain Ferguson
9 Constructivism and global constitutionalism 116
Jan Wilkens
10 Realist perspectives on global constitutionalism 130
Oliver Jütersonke
11 Critical theory 141
Gavin W. Anderson
12 The English School and global constitutionalism 153
Filippo Costa Buranelli
13 Postcolonial global constitutionalism 167
Sigrid Boysen
14 Feminist approaches to global constitutionalism 186
Ruth Houghton

PART III LEGAL THEORIES
15 Natural law at the foundation of global constitutionalism 209
Mary Ellen O’Connell
16 International legal constitutionalism, legal forms and the need for villains 226
Jean d’Aspremont
17 Interactional legal theory, the international rule of law and global
constitutionalism 241
Jutta Brunnée and Stephen J. Toope
18 The shifting relationship between functionalism and global constitutionalism 254
Jeffrey L. Dunoff
19 Global constitutionalism and international public authority in the crisis
of liberal internationalism 266
Armin von Bogdandy, Matthias Goldmann and Ingo Venzke

PART IV PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES
20 Global constitutionalism and the rule of law 295
Mattias Kumm
21 Balance of powers 309
Eoin Carolan
22 Constituent power in global constitutionalism 319
Peter Niesen
23 Human rights as transnational constitutional law 332
Samantha Besson
24 Proportionality as a global constitutional principle 347
Anne Peters
25 Written versus unwritten: two views on the form of an international
constitution 364
Bardo Fassbender
26 Transnational litigation networks: agents of change in the global
constitutional order 374
Jill Bähring
27 Human rights, sovereignty and the use of force 396
Sassan Gholiagha

PART V INSTITUTIONS AND FRAMEWORKS
28 International judicial review 410
Başak ‚alõ
29 Legislatures 424
M.J. Peterson
30 Executive and exception 437
William E. Scheuerman
31 Federalism: from constitutionalism to constitutionalization? 448
Thomas O. Hueglin
32 The UN Charter and global constitutionalism? 460
Michael W. Doyle
33 Functionalism, constitutionalism and the United Nations 477
Jan Klabbers
34 The European Union and global constitutionalism 490
Jo Shaw
35 The International Criminal Court and global constitutionalism 508
Andrea Birdsall and Anthony F. Lang, Jr.
36 Global commercial constitutionalization: the World Trade Organization 519
Joel P. Trachtman

PART VI NEW HORIZONS
37 Global constitutionalism and outer space governance 529
Adam Bower
38 The political economy of global constitutionalism 542
Christine Schwöbel-Patel
39 Global religion in a post-Westphalia world 556
Susanna Mancini
40 Constitutionalism and pluralism 568
Neil Walker

More info on EE.

Wednesday 17 July 2024

BOOK: Marco ROSCINI, "International Law and the Principle of Non-Intervention: History, Theory and Interactions with Other Principles" (Oxford University Press, 2024)

Source: OUP

Description:

The principle of non-intervention in the domestic affairs of states is one of the most venerable principles of international law but the determination of its exact content has remained an enigma that has haunted generations of international lawyers. This book solves this problem and identifies what the principle of non-intervention specifically prohibits, and what it does not. The principle in question is strictly linked to some fundamental notions of international law, such as sovereignty, use of force, and self-determination: its study, therefore, is of great significance as it offers a fascinating opportunity to explore the macrostructures of international law. Through a comprehensive survey of primary documents, as well as through an extensive evaluation of state practice and literature search, the book provides a systematic and coherent analysis of the principle of non-intervention. The first two chapters tell the story of the principle of non-intervention throughout the centuries up to the present day. Chapters III and IV focus on theory and identify what coercion of state means, what forms of coercion (armed, economic, political subversive) can constitute an unlawful intervention, and the role played by consent in this context. Chapters V, VI, and VII explore the interactions of the principle of non-intervention with other fundamental principles of contemporary international law, namely the principle of internal and external self-determination and the respect for international human rights law and international humanitarian law. Finally, Chapter VIII investigates whether and when cyber operations can constitute an unlawful intervention in the domestic affairs of other states.

Table of contents:

Introduction

I The Development of the Principle of Non-Intervention from the End of the Religious Wars in Europe to the Outbreak of the Second World War

II The Principle of Non-Intervention in the Framework of the Sources of Contemporary International Law and in the Current Scholarly Debate

III The Content of the Principle of Non-Intervention

IV The Application of the Principle of Non-Intervention to Civil Strife and the Role of Consent

V The Interaction between the Principle of Non-Intervention and that of Internal Self-Determination

VI The Interaction between the Principle of Non-Intervention and that of External Self-Determination

VII The Interaction between the Principle of Non-Intervention and Respect for International Human Rights Law and International Humanitarian Law

VIII The Principle of Non-Intervention in the Information Age: Cyber Operations as a New Means of Coercion in the Domestic Affairs of States

General Conclusions

 See OUP for more info.

Tuesday 9 July 2024

CONFERENCE PROGRAM: 19th ESIL Annual Conference, IG History of International Law Pre-conference Workshop, "Historical Perspectives on Technological Change and International Law" (4 September, 2024, Vilnius)

 A close up of a painting

Description automatically generated

2024 ESIL Annual Conference Technological Change and International Law

Pre-Conference Workshop:

Historical Perspectives on Technological Change and International Law

Wednesday 4th September 2024, 15.45-18.45, Vilnius

Centuries have witnessed the inexorable march of technological innovation, each stride leaving an indelible mark on the canvas of international law. History is rife with examples illustrating the intricate interplay between technology and international law, with new disciplines emerged, and old doctrines disappeared. This year, our speakers from two panels will discuss the way and way different disciplines of international law dealt with technological changes in various historical periods to shed light on the future.

Programme

15:45 – 16:00 

Introduction and words of welcome (Jaanika Erne)


16:00 – 16:45

Panel 1: Technological changes in the history of the law of the sea

 

Zhaoran Lin (Peking University): Unmanned Maritime Vehicles and the Changing Law of Naval Warfare: A Historical Perspective

 

Stefano Cattelan (Vrije Universiteit Brussel): Visualising, exploring, and claiming the oceans: cartography and nautical technology in an age of transition (c. 15th-16th centuries)


 

Moderator: Sze Hong Lam (Leiden University)


16:45-17:00

Questions & Answers


17:00-17:15

Break


17:15-18:15

Panel 2: Technological changes since the 1920s

 

María Belén Paoletta (Georgetown University) & Iván Levy (Columbia University): Tech-Fueled Aspects on State Responsibility

 

Aathira Raju (Central University of Kerala): The Impact of the Industrial Revolution on Colonial Labour- A Critique

 

Dénes Legeza (University of Szeged): The Impact of Sound Recording on International Copyright Law

 

Moderator: Anastasia Hammerschmied (University of Vienna)


18:15:18:30

Questions & Answers


18:30-18:45

Conclusive remarks (Jaanika Erne)

 

Convenors

Anastasia Hammerschmied – Florenz Volkaert - Jaanika Erne – Sze Hong Lam (Ocean)

 

Monday 1 July 2024

BOOK: Randall LESAFFER & Anne PETERS (eds), "The Cambridge History of International Law. Volume 1. The Historiography of International Law" (The Cambridge History of International Law, Cambridge University Press, 2024)

Source: CUP



Description:

Volume I of The Cambridge History of International Law introduces the historiography of international law as a field of scholarship. After a general introduction to the purposes and design of the series, Part 1 of this volume highlights the diversity of the field in terms of methodologies, disciplinary approaches, and perspectives that have informed both older and newer historiographies in the recent three decades of its rapid expansion. Part 2 surveys the history of international legal history writing from different regions of the world, spanning roughly the past two centuries. The book therefore offers the most complete treatment of the historical development and current state of international law history writing, using both a global and an interdisciplinary perspective.

Introduces The Cambridge History of International Law series
Offers a wide ranging survey of the historiography of international law from a global perspective
Addresses the contributions of various disciplines – law, history, political thought, economics – and regional traditions to the historiography of international law

Table of Contents

1. Scope, scale and humility in the history of international law 
Randall Lesaffer
Part I. 
The Historiography of International Law: Methods and Approaches Randall Lesaffer and Anne Peters
2. A thousand flowers blooming, or the desert of the real? International Law and its many problems of history 
Nehal Bhuta
3. Political thought and the historiography of international law
Mark Somos
4. The turn to the history of international law in the discipline of international relations 
Giovanni Mantilla and Carsten-Andreas Schulz
5. Economic history and international law: a peculiar absence 
Christopher Casey
Part II. The Historiography of International Law: Regional Traditions 
Randall Lesaffer and Anne Peters
6. The historiography of international law in East Asia 
Keun-Gwan Lee
7. The historiography of international law in sub-Saharan Africa 
Inge Van Hulle
8. The historiography of international law on the European continent
Frederik Dhondt
9. The historiography of international law in Russia and its successor states
Lauri Mälksoo
10. 'The most neglected province': British historiography of international law
David Armitage and Ignacio de la Rasilla
11. The view from the Leviathan: history of international law in the hegemon
John Fabian Witt
12. Using history in Latin America
Arnulf Becker Lorca
Index.

More info with CUP.

Thursday 6 June 2024

BOOK: Raphaël CAHEN, Sarah KIMBLE, Pierre ALLORANT, Walter BADIER & Sean MORRIS (eds), Relations internationales et droit(s): acteurs, institutions et législations comparées (1815-1914) / Law(s) and international relations: actors, institutions, and comparative legislation (1815-1914) (Pédone, 2024)


Description:

L’histoire du droit international et l’histoire des relations internationales connaissent un renouveau historiographique depuis une vingtaine d’années. Le bicentenaire du congrès de Vienne a notamment permis de reconsidérer la mise en place du concert européen, comme système international, au XIXe siècle. L’étude des rapports entre relations internationales et droit(s) permet ainsi de faire émerger un champ de recherche qui se révèle d’une grande richesse. Ce livre en apporte la preuve. Il s'articule autour de trois axes : les actrices et acteurs des relations internationales et du droit international (juristes, magistrats, avocats, activistes, éditeurs) ; les institutions du droit international et du droit comparé (ministère des affaires étrangères, tribunaux, Conseil d’État, universités, académies) ; les experts et les expertises en droit international. L’ouvrage réunit plus d’une vingtaine de contributions inédites, en anglais et en français, proposées par des auteurs venant de plusieurs continents. Chaque contribution explore des aspects novateurs du rapport entre droit(s) et relations internationales au XIXe  siècle. Soit en s’intéressant à une ou des institutions, soit à un groupe d'actrices ou d’acteurs, conseillers juridiques, avocats, juges, activistes, publicistes, ou encore à travers la biographie d’un juriste. Plusieurs chapitres éclairent la naissance de la profession de « juriste internationaliste », de même que le lien entre les législations comparées et le droit international.

The history of international law and international relations has been revived in the last twenty years. In particular, the bicentenary of the Congress of Vienna has provided an opportunity to reconsider the establishment of the European concert as an international system in the 19th century. The study of the relationship between international relations and law(s) has given rise to a rich field of research. This book is proof of that. It focuses on three main areas: those involved in international relations and international law (jurists, magistrates, lawyers, activists, publishers); international and comparative law institutions (Ministry of Foreign Affairs, courts, Council of State, universities, academies); and experts and expert reports on international law. The book combines more than twenty original contributions, in English and French, by authors from several continents. Each contribution explores innovative aspects of the relationship between law and international relations in the nineteenth century. The focus is either on one or more institutions or on a group of actors - legal advisers, lawyers, judges, activists, publicists - or on the biography of a jurist. Several chapters shed light on the birth of the profession of 'internationalist lawyer', as well as the link between comparative legislation and international law.

Table of Contents:

INTRODUCTION 

Chapter 1. Introduction : law(s) and international relations – actors, institutions and comparative legislation (1815-1914) Raphaël CAHEN and P. Sean MORRIS ............................................................. 17 

PREMIÈRE PARTIE ACTRICES ET ACTEURS DES RELATIONS INTERNATIONALES ET DU DROIT INTERNATIONAL 

Chapitre 2. Aux origines du droit international public contemporain : la mission londonienne de Walewski, émissaire du Gouvernement national de Varsovie, en 1831 Bruno MARTIN-GAY ....................................................................................... 31 

Chapter 3. Women’s rights and the rights of man : women’s status under law as the measure of « civilization » in French political and legal discourse, 1869-1914 Sara L. KIMBLE ............................................................................................... 59 

Chapter 4. Women’s leagues of nations. Women formulating international peace law in the long XIXth century Marion RÖWEKAMP ......................................................................................... 89 

Chapitre 5. Alphonse Rivier, Internationaliste fonctionnel et juriste disponible ? Retour sur la génération de 1873 Philippe RYGIEL ............................................................................................ 115 

Chapter 6. Gustaw Roszkowski on the changes in public international law, 1870–1910 Paweł FIKTUS ................................................................................................ 139 

Chapter 7. Teaching the Law of Nations in King Leopold’s Foreign Office : Léon Arendt’s Droit des gens Course (1903) Frederik DHONDT .......................................................................................... 169

DEUXIÈME PARTIE INSTITUTIONS DU DROIT INTERNATIONAL ET DU DROIT COMPARÉ Chapter 8. Peace through law in early nineteenth century Switzerland. Jean-Jacques de Sellon (1782-1839) and the Société de la paix de Genève (1830-1839) Wouter DE RYCKE ......................................................................................... 203 

Chapitre 9. L’Académie des sciences morales et politiques et le droit international (1832-1914) Raphaël CAHEN ............................................................................................. 245 

Chapitre 10. La note d’Alphonse Royer (1856). Une contribution méconnue à la réflexion sur la codification du droit civil ottoman Jean-Romain FERRAND-HUS ......................................................................... 269 

Chapitre 11. Les relations internationales dans la jurisprudence du Conseil d’Etat (1815-1914) Maxime CHARITÉ .......................................................................................... 299 

Chapitre 12. Ubi societas gentium ibi jus inter gentes. L’émergence d’un ordre juridique international Bilel HAMDI .................................................................................................. 315 

Chapitre 13. Droit égyptien, legal transplants et législations comparées. Aperçu historique, actualité et devenir des relations franco-égyptiennes dans le domaine juridique Yousra CHAABAN .......................................................................................... 333 

Chapitre 14 Naissance et affirmation de la Societé de législation comparée (1869-1900) Pierre ALLORANT et Walter BADIER ............................................................. 353 

TROISIÈME PARTIE EXPERTS ET EXPERTISES DU DROIT INTERNATIONAL 

Chapitre 15. Renseignement, diplomatie et relations internationales. Le rôle de la connaissance dans les origines de l’Empire du capital britannique en Amérique latine Mariano SCHLEZ ........................................................................................... 373 

Chapter 16. Mimicry of international law : Andres Bello’s Principios de Derecho Internacional Nina KELLER-KEMMERER ............................................................................. 399 

Chapter 17. Prussia and international slavery laws Saskia GEISLER ............................................................................................. 427 

Chapitre 18. L’économie des droits compensateurs dans le droit international du commerce avant-guerre : quel rôle pour la science économique dans la doctrine juridique ? Florenz VOLKAERT ....................................................................................... 439 

Chapter 19. Inseparable pairs for modernising Japan? Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs and academia, 1880-1914 Hirofumi OGURI ............................................................................................ 463 

Chapitre 20. André Gros, Jurisconsulte du Ministère des affaires étrangères Pierre-François LAVAL .................................................................................. 493 

CONCLUSION 

Chapter 21. Conclusion : toxic Optimism ? Miloš VEC ..................................................................................................... 507

More info with the the publisher.

Tuesday 7 May 2024

BOOK: Hendrik SIMON, "A Century of Anarchy? War, Normativity, and the Birth of Modern International Order" (OUP, The History and Theory of International Law, 2024)

Source: OUP

The nineteenth century has been understood as an age in which states could wage war against each other if they deemed it politically necessary. According to this narrative, it was not until the establishment of the League of Nations, the Kellogg-Briand Pact, and the UN Charter that the 'free right to go to war' (liberum ius ad bellum) was gradually outlawed. Better times dawned as this anarchy of waging war ended, resulting in radical transformations of international law and politics.

However, as a 'free right to go to war' has never been empirically proven, this story of progress is puzzling. In A Century of Anarchy?: War, Normativity, and the Birth of Modern International Order, Hendrik Simon challenges this narrative by outlining a genealogy of modern war justifications and drawing on scientific, political, and public discourses. He argues that liberum ius ad bellum is an invention created by realist legal scholars in Imperial Germany who argued against the mainstream of European liberalism and, paradoxically, that the now forgotten Sonderweg reading was universalized in international historiographies after the World Wars.

A Century of Anarchy? is a compelling read for historians, jurists, political theorists, international relations scholars, and anyone interested in understanding the emergence of the modern international order. In this groundbreaking work, Simon not only artfully deconstructs the myth of liberum ius ad bellum but also traces the political and theoretical roots of the modern prohibition of war to the long nineteenth century (1789-1918).

Setting the Scene
1:Introduction: A Century of Anarchy, a Right to War?
2:Thesis and Antithesis: Why States Justify War

Part I. Justifying War in the Nineteenth Century: A European Discourse
3:On the Threshold of Modernity: From Revolutionizing to Reordering War
4:Birth of an International Order
5:Between Might and Right: Justified Wars and Multiple Normativities
6:The Promise of 'Peace through Law' in the Shadow of War

Part II. Emergence of a Myth: A German Sonderweg?
7:Recht zum Krieg: A Clausewitzian Tradition
8:A Hegemonic Discourse? On Mainstream(s) and Myth(s)
9:Antinomianism: The Kaiserreich's Politics of Justifying War
10:Old Order, New Order: Historiography between Anarchy and Progress
Conclusion
11:War, Normativity, and the Birth of Modern International Order

Hendrik Simon, Researcher, Peace Research Institute Frankfurt

Hendrik Simon is a postdoctoral researcher at the Peace Research Institute Frankfurt (PRIF) and Lecturer at Goethe University Frankfurt. He was Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Advanced International Theory/University of Sussex (2017), at the University of Vienna (2018, 2016), at the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History Frankfurt (2015-16) and at the Cluster of Excellence 'Normative Orders' (2011-12). Publications include The Justification of War and International Order. From Past to Present (OUP 2021; co-edited with Lothar Brock); and 'The Myth of Liberum Ius ad Bellum. Justifying War in 19th-Century International Legal Theory and Political Practice', 29 European Journal of International Law (2018).

More inof with OUP.

Monday 6 May 2024

CALL FOR PAPERS: Legal Histories of Empire IV: Empires in Touch (University of Toronto, 10-12 July 2025, DEADLINE: 31 August 2024)

Source: LHBE

Call For Papers 

Legal Histories of Empire IV 

Empires in Touch 

St Michael’s College, University of Toronto 

July 10-12, 2025 

Law in Empire. Law among Empires. We invite papers that consider how law has worked within empires at different times and places, how it has worked at the contact points between empires, and how imperial subjects have attempted to work law to their advantage. Law has facilitated, constituted, and enabled connections. People and societies have both suffered and benefitted from the uncertainties produced as empires have spread, imposed themselves on local populations, and competed with each other. Legal ideas have moved with people who had legal training and people without it. Institutions have formed and reformed, succeeded, failed, and produced intended and unintended consequences. In this fourth Legal Histories of Empire conference, we seek to explore these movements and connections, including the construction of illegality and non-legality. We hope to bring together historians working in different legal traditions and with a range of different sources to reveal the threads that have bound, ordered, and separated different empires, places, laws and legal traditions across the globe. 

Please send abstracts to LHE2025conference@uts.edu.au by 31 August 2024. Acceptances will be sent by the middle of October 2024. We are pursuing avenues to allow us to provide funding for travel, especially for graduate students and scholars from the Global South. Those interested in seeking funding should sign up for updates from our website, lhbe.org. 

Format: Chiefly in-person. We may have some limited capacity for online participation. Please indicate on your abstract whether your participation is contingent on the availability of online participation.

Personal information: For each participant (presenter, chair, or commentator), please submit: 1) Biographical details of no more than 150 words; 2) Where, and in what timezone, you will be in July 2025 if you are not physically in Toronto. 

Individual papers: If you are submitting an individual paper, please submit an abstract of no more than 200 words. Panels (of no more than 4 speakers: a chair and/or commentator can be included): If you are submitting a panel, please include: 1) A panel abstract of no more than 150 words; and 2) Individual paper abstracts of no more than 200 words. 

Streams: We anticipate having streams in the program on the following themes, coordinated by the scholars listed below. If your proposal is to a particular stream please indicate that clearly in your abstract. 

Illegality in Empire: Dr David Chan Smith 

The American Empire: Dr Sam Erman 

Empire in Oceania: Dr Mary Mitchell 

Law in Africa: Dr Yolanda Osondu 

Legal Transfer in the Common Law World: Prof Stefan Vogenauer and Dr Donal Coffey 

Comparing Empires: Judicial Institutions and Legal Actors: Prof Heikki Pihlajamäki


Consult the CfP or the website of the Legal Histories of Empire.