ESIL Interest Group History of International Law

ESIL Interest Group History of International Law

maandag 16 oktober 2017

BOOK: Rosalyn HIGGINS, Dapo AKANDE, Sandesh SIVAKUMARAN & James SLOAN, Oppenheim’s International Law. United Nations (Oxford: OUP, 2017)

Dame Rosalyn Higgins QC presents the two volumes of Oppenheim’s International Law: United Nations over at the EJIL:Talk!-blog.

First paragraphs:
October 2017 marks the publication of a new two-volume work under the prestigious ‘Oppenheim’ banner, Oppenheim’s International Law: United Nations. It traces the evolution of the United Nations and the legal issues it daily faces. It is also an essential tool for practitioners as they address the legal problems of today at the United Nations.Image result for oppenheims international law united nations In 1992, Sir Robert Jennings and Sir Arthur Watts, to great acclaim, had published the 9thedition of Oppenheim’s International Law, Volume I: Peace. It had taken them long years to prepare. The eighth edition, prepared by Sir Hersch Lauterpacht, had been published in 1955. In 1994, I received an unexpected letter from Sir Robert Jennings and Sir Arthur Watts. In it they informed me that in the Preface to the 8thedition of Oppenheim, it had been envisaged that one day a volume of that great work would need to address the new phenomenon of international organizations. A new volume would be required for this work, which they invited me to undertake.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Latin America and International Law (8-9 Feb 2018, University of Hamburg/University of the Andes); DEADLINE 8 DEC 2017

(Image source: oley.az)

From February 8 to 9, 2018, the Albrecht Mendelssohn Bartholdy  
Graduate School of Law (University of Hamburg) in conjunction with  
Professor José Manuel Barreto Soler (Universidad de los Andes,  
Universidad Externado) organizes a conference on the history of  
international law in Latin American.


Topic:

The conference title is roughly borrowed from Alejandro Álvarez' very  
influential (but also controversially discussed) article "Latin  
America and Inernational Law" from 1909. Insprired by his work, we aim  
at exploring the complex relationship between Latin America and  
international law in the past centuries.

In the last few years, questions concerning Latin America's historic  
relationship to international law have moved to the focus of academic  
attention. Several outstanding treatises have been published on and  
conferences have dealt with this topic. But its study is still a  
comparably recent academic field (especially in Europe). The  
conference shall contribute to its further sharpening and to the  
creation of new perspectives on the study of the history of  
international law in Latin America.


Call for Papers:

We would like to invite everybody interested in the study of the  
history of international law in Latin America (doctoral students,  
early scholars, professors, practitioners, etc.) to participate in our  
call and to submit proposals for contributions on any of the listed  
subtopics (see below).

Please send your application in one single PDF file including

· your proposal of around 300 - 500 words and

· a brief CV (indicating also your institutional affiliation)

until December 3, 2017, to matthias.packeiser@uni-hamburg.de

The selection of speakers will be based on the quality of their  
abstracts and the abstract's suitability to the overall topic of the  
conference. Selected candidates will be informed by December 8, 2017.


List of Subtopics:

    International Law in the Americas before Independence

    International Law and the Independence in the Americas

    International Law, United States' Imperialism and Latin America

    The Particularity of Latin American International Law

    International Law, Globalization, and Latin America

    New Latin American Approaches to International Law?

    Germany and the History of International Law in the Americas


Further information and a more detailed call for papers are available  
here: uhh.de/rw-latin-america

dinsdag 10 oktober 2017

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Historians Without Borders: Writing the Histories of International Organizations (Leiden: Leiden University, 22-23 Mar 2018); DEADLINE 13 Nov 2017

(image source: Leiden University)

HISTORIANS WITHOUT BORDERS
Writing Histories of International Organizations
Leiden University – 22-23 March 2018
 
This workshop is organized by the ERC project ‘Rethinking Disability’. It is intended to bring together early-career researchers from different fields working on international organizations, to discuss methodological challenges together with peers and established scholars. A combination of a master class, keynote lectures, and roundtable discussions aims at providing an informal and interactive setting for the exchange of ideas and perspectives. Confirmed speakers include:
  • Davide Rodogno (The Graduate Institute, Geneva)
  • Corinne Pernet (University of Geneva)
  • Kiran Patel (Maastricht University)
Call for abstracts
Ever since the paradigm of ‘globalization’ has found its way into the field of history, ways of writing histories beyond borders have proliferated. Today, historians no longer need to justify enlarging their geographical scope beyond the national, but it can nonetheless be a daunting task to decide on how to do this. While we are going beyond borders, the choice for a translocal, transnational, transregional or global history still reveals our preference for a certain scale. Methodologically, our toolbox now offers us concepts such as comparisons, transfers, connections, entanglements and circulations. As different approaches focus on different concepts, choosing one approach often entails a rejection of other possible approaches. Transnational historians will distance themselves from comparative history; global history, as any global historian will tell you, is not the same as world history. The further we seem to get in advancing the call for breaking with our ‘methodological nationalism’, the more we seem to split up into different subfields, where fruitful dialogue becomes increasingly difficult. The purpose of this workshop is to open up this dialogue, to see what specific advantages different approaches can offer and how they can be best put to use.
In order to do this, the workshop will focus on the history of international organizations (IOs), as they are “extremely stimulating heuristic objects for historians of globalism in that they represent a true laboratory of the accords and tensions at work between the international, national, and local scenes and frames of reference” (Kott, 2011, p. 449). Therefore, writing their history automatically compels us to think about methodologies of doing ‘history beyond borders’. Although they automatically force historians to think about international connections, it is equally important to consider the continuing role of local or national scales within international organizations. Research objects in this regard can encompass both the main intergovernmental organizations (IOs) – such as the League of Nations, the UN or the NATO – and the vast field of International Non-Governmental Organizations (INGOs), spanning a diverse range of causes from the environment (Greenpeace), over human rights (Amnesty International), to humanitarianism (Médecins sans frontières).
For this workshop, we are looking for original contributions on the history of IOs and INGOs, based on empirical research, but with explicit methodological reflections on transnational, global, comparative, etc. approaches. Questions raised can include (but are not limited to):
  • What specific advantages do different approaches bring to the history of international organizations?
  • Are these approaches mutually exclusive, or do we need to combine different perspectives and concepts?
  • What are some of the methodological challenges in writing the history of international organizations, in terms of analyzing connections, entanglements, comparisons, etc.?
  • What are some of the practical challenges in writing the history of international organizations, in terms of mobility, language barriers, cultural sensitivity, etc.?
  • How can we deal with the fact that levels can be used both as analytical concepts (used by the historian) and as historical concepts (used by the historical actors)?
  • How can we deal with different uses of terms like international, national, local, e.g. as level, geographical or spatial unit or loyalty of a historical actor?
  • How can we deal with the (hidden) hierarchy of terms or levels like global, national, etc.?
Program
The workshop will offer a combination of a master class, keynote lectures, and roundtable discussions. It will start on 22 March in the afternoon, with a master class by Davide Rodogno (The Graduate Institute, Geneva), followed by a keynote lecture by Corinne Pernet (University of Geneva). The second day (23 March) will consist of roundtable sessions, where participants present their research and enter into discussion. Senior researchers will chair these sessions and Kiran Patel (Maastricht University) will deliver a closing keynote.
Submission of abstracts
Please send an abstract of max. 500 words and a short CV to the following email address: rethinkingdisability@hum.leidenuniv.nl by 13 November 2017. Questions to the organizers can be sent using the same address. Authors will be notified regarding the acceptance of their contribution by 20 November. Invited participants will be expected to submit a short draft version of a more substantial paper two weeks prior to the event, which will be circulated among all other participants. Participants who are accepted to present their paper are also automatically accepted to participate in the master class. If you are unable or do not wish to attend the master class, kindly indicate this in your application.
Organization
The workshop is initiated and hosted by the research team of the ERC project ‘Rethinking Disability: the Global Impact of the International Year of Disabled Persons (1981) in Historical Perspective’, based in the Institute for History at Leiden University. It is supported by the Huizinga Institute, the national Dutch research network for Cultural History.
Contact Email: 
URL: 


(source: HNet)

zaterdag 7 oktober 2017

ARTICLE: Oona A. HATHAWAY, William HOLSTE, Scott J. SHAPIRO, Jacqueline VAN DE VELDE & Lisa LACHOWICZ, War Manifestos (U Chicago Law Review)



International Law Reporter references the following article:

This Article is the first to examine “war manifestos,” documents that set out the legal reasons sovereigns provided for going to war from the late-fifteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries. We have assembled the world’s largest collection of war manifestos — over 350 — in languages as diverse as Classical Chinese, German, French, Latin, Serbo-Croatian and Dutch. Prior Anglophone scholarship has almost entirely missed war manifestos. This gap in the literature has produced a correspondingly large gap in our understanding of the role of war during the period in which manifestos were commonly used. Examining these previously ignored manifestos reveals that states exercised the right to wage war in ways that would be inconceivable today. In short, the right to intervene militarily could be asserted in any situation where a legal right had been violated and all peaceful channels had been explored and exhausted. The Article begins by describing war manifestos. It then explores their history and evolution over the course of five centuries, explains the purposes they served for sovereigns, shows the many “just causes” they cited for war, and, finally, considers the lessons they hold for modern legal dilemmas. The discovery of war manifestos as a set of legal documents offers lawyers and legal scholars something rare: a new window into the international legal universe of the past. That is not only valuable in itself, but it also casts entirely new light on several long-standing legal debates.

More information on SSRN.

DISCOUNT: 25% off Hague Academy publications at Brill

Brill offers a reduction of up to 25% on several titles in the publications of the Hague Academy of International Law Series. The rebate expires on 15 December 2017.

More information with the publisher here.

dinsdag 3 oktober 2017

E-LECTURE SERIES and Bibliography: I-HILT (Tilburg University)

(image source: tilburguniversity.edu)

Dra. Ana Delic spread the following message from the Institute for the History of International Law at Tilburg University:

The Institute for the History of International Law@Tilburg (I-HILT)  is organizing a series of lectures on international legal history and you are cordially invited! We kick off the program with Prof. Randall Lesaffer presenting 'Aggression before Versailles' on 25 October 3-4 pm (M 020). See the exciting list of speakers in the 2017-2018 program attached.  Are you unable to attend? The lectures will subsequently be available for streaming on the I-HILT webpage under the E-LECTURES tab: https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/research/institutes-and-research-groups/i-hilt/electures/ Also, I-HILT's bibliography of crucial primary and secondary sources of international legal history has just been updated. The bibliography is available in pdf and endnote (with a useful search option):https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/research/institutes-and-research-groups/i-hilt/i-hilt-bibliography/

The attachment in question can be consulted here.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Hegemony in the International Order (Rome, 11-12 Jun 2018); DEADLINE 31 Mar 2018

“Hegemony in the International Order”
June 11-12, 2018
University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome
Co-Sponsored by the Transnational Theory Network (TLPT-Network), the Italian Society of Political Philosophy (SIFP) and the European Society of International Law (ESIL)
(image source: Wikimedia Commons)

Post WWII international law and politics has promised a more just and free world. Liberal values of equality, human rights and freedom have shaped international relations, infusing also the ‘ethical turn’ of international law with the human rights revolution and the formalization of jus cogens peremptory norms. Regional orders like the EU have grown both in terms of centralized competences and in the possibility of allowing higher circulation of goods and people. The international political system as a whole has seen one of its greatest times of rights consolidation and economic fluxes which have certainly favored wide cultural contaminations.

Yet, more recent developments of international politics show some of the drawbacks of such epochal shift, raising demands of democratic governance, individual interests representation etc. Lack of political participation at the transnational level, the North-South and the East-West divides, migratory flows altogether signal a disconnection and a persistent friction between economic, legal and political sectors. What takes the appearance of a wide share of goods and benefits brought about by globalization turns into unequal forms of redistributory patterns, unmasking the reality of power-control and dominance of single actors, either in the form of a super-state or a multinational corporation.

Hegemonic entities seems therefore to have taken advantage of those spaces of economic and legal freedom that progressive liberalism has opened up and used them to the advantage of limited beneficiaries, exploiting the opportunities created therewith.

The workshop wants to investigate the contemporary significance of hegemony in the international realm. More specifically its aim is to assess whether and to what extent neo-Gramscian, neo-hegemonic or, alternatively, post-hegemonic forms of power help understanding law and politics in regional and global contexts.

Since hegemony requires support and complicity also by subordinated groups, how does this concept differ from the notion of imperialism and that of unilateralism? What forms of ideological solidarities as well as material and military alliances are necessary for hegemonic effectiveness?
Furthermore, are there hegemonic phases that have accompanied the so-called “human rights revolution” since the aftermath of WWII? In what ways, eventually, it is possible to trace a counter-history to the mantra of a global constitutional progression and peace?
Papers in philosophy, law or politics addressing any of the issues above or suggesting relevant insights into the topic. In order to allow time for adequate presentation and discussion only a limited number of people will be selected (approx.10).

Abstract Submission

Abstracts between 700-1000 or more should be submitted by 31 March 2018 to Claudio.Corradetti@uniroma2.it

(source: International Law Reporter)