ESIL Interest Group History of International Law

ESIL Interest Group History of International Law

maandag 30 juli 2018

BOOK: Roxana BANU, Nineteenth Century Perspectives on Private International Law [The History and Theory of International Law] (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018). ISBN 9780198819844, £70.00


(Source: OUP)

Oxford University Press has published a new book on 19th century perspectives to private international law.

ABOUT THE BOOK

Private International Law is often criticized for failing to curb private power in the transnational realm. The field appears disinterested or powerless in addressing global economic and social inequality. Scholars have frequently blamed this failure on the separation between private and public international law at the end of the nineteenth century and on private international law's increasing alignment with private law.

Through a contextual historical analysis, Roxana Banu questions these premises. By reviewing a broad range of scholarship from six jurisdictions (the United States, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, Italy, and the Netherlands) she shows that far from injecting an impetus for social justice, the alignment between private and public international law introduced much of private international law's formalism and neutrality. She also uncovers various nineteenth century private law theories that portrayed a social, relationally constituted image of the transnational agent, thus contesting both individualistic and state-centric premises for regulating cross-border inter-personal relations.

Overall, this study argues that the inherited shortcomings of contemporary private international law stem more from the incorporation of nineteenth century theories of sovereignty and state rights than from theoretical premises of private law. In turn, by reconsidering the relational premises of the nineteenth century private law perspectives discussed in this book, Banu contends that private international law could take centre stage in efforts to increase social and economic equality by fostering individual agency and social responsibility in the transnational realm.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Roxana Banu, Assistant Professor, Western Law School, Ontario
Roxana Banu is an Assistant Professor of Law at Western Law School, Ontario, Canada. Prior to joining Western Law School, Banu taught Private International Law at Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto, Canada and at Fordham Law School in New York City.More information here

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1: Introduction
2: Individual- and State-Centered Perspectives in Nineteenth Century Private International Law
3: . Individual- and State-Centered Perspectives in Nineteenth Century Europe
4: Tracing the Relational Internationalist Perspective in Europe After World War II
5: Individual-centered and State-centered Internationalist Perspectives in American Private International Law Theory
6: Recognition, Rights, and Reasonable Expectations
7: Legitimacy and Autonomy
8: Universalism Versus Uniformity
9: Conclusions

More information here

vrijdag 27 juli 2018

BOOK: Gordon MARTEL (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Diplomacy (Chichester/Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2018), 4 vol. ISBN 978-1-118-88791-2, 845 USD

Book abstract:
The Encyclopedia of Diplomacy is a complete and authoritative 4-volume compendium of the most important events, people and terms associated with diplomacy and international relations from ancient times to the present, from a global perspective. An invaluable resource for anyone interested in diplomacy, its history and the relations between states; Includes newer areas of scholarship such as the role of non-state organizations, including the UN and Médecins Sans Frontières, and the exercise of soft power, as well as issues of globalization and climate change; Provides clear, concise information on the most important events, people, and terms associated with diplomacy and international relations in an A-Z format; All entries are rigorously peer reviewed to ensure the highest quality of scholarship; Provides a platform to introduce unfamiliar terms and concepts to students engaging with the literature of the field for the first time

On the editor:
GORDON MARTEL is Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Northern British Columbia and Adjunct Professor at the University of Victoria. He has written widely on the history of diplomacy, international relations, and modern war. Among his best-known works are Imperial Diplomacy (1985) and The Origins of the First World War (fourth edition, 2008). He was one of the founding editors of the leading scholarly journal in the field, The International History Review, and is editor of "Seminar Studies in History". He has edited numerous scholarly publications including The World War Two Reader (2004), A Companion to Europe, 1900-1945 (Wiley Blackwell, 2006), A Companion to International History, 1900-2001 (Wiley Blackwell, 2007), and The Encyclopedia of War (Wiley Blackwell, 2011).
More information here.

donderdag 26 juli 2018

BOOK: Laurent JALABERT, Les prisonniers de guerre, XVe-XIXe siècle : entre marginalisation et reconnaissance (Rennes: Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2018),

(image source: PURennes)

Book abstract:
La thématique des prisonniers de guerre reste peu connue pour l’époque moderne, au moment où les armées connaissent massification et nationalisation de leurs effectifs. Le présent livre aborde divers aspects de cette question et le cheminement jusqu’au moment où se développent et s’institutionnalisent droits et statuts des prisonniers de guerre, du XVe au XIXe siècle.
 On the editor:
Laurent Jalabert est maître de conférences habilité en histoire moderne (université de Lorraine, CRULH EA 3945). Ses recherches initiales concernent l’histoire confessionnelle du XVIIe au XIXe siècle dans l’Empire et s’orientent à présent vers l’histoire militaire et celle des petits États, ainsi que les questions de mémoire et d’identité.
Table of contents (here), information on contributors (here) and introduction (here) available.

More information: publisher's website.

VACANCY: Academic Assistant, International and European Law (Vrije Universiteit Brussel, DEADLINE 25 AUG 2018)

(image source: VUB)

The Faculty of Law and Criminology of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) advertises a position for an Academic Assistant (100%) in International and European Law, charged with teaching (40%) and research (60%) assignments. Starting date 1 October 2018.

Full Dutch proficiency is required, since teaching takes place in Dutch.

More information here.

woensdag 25 juli 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS: Peace Making after the First World War 1919-1923 (National Archives, FCO Historians, Strathclyde University, LSE, British International History Group) (Kew: National Archives, 27-28 JUN 2019); DEADLINE 1 DEC 2018

(image source: Wikimedia Commons)

The National Archives, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office Historians, the University of Strathclyde, the International History Department at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and the British International History Group invite submissions for the upcoming conference ‘Peace making after the First World War 1919 – 1923’.
Taking place from Thursday 27 to Friday 28 June 2019, the first day of the conference will be held at The National Archives and includes a keynote lecture by Professor David Stevenson. The second day of the conference will be hosted by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office Historians at Lancaster House, and will see a range of experts speak on aspects of the peace making process followed by a round table discussion.
Dr Juliette Desplat, Head of Modern Overseas, Intelligence and Security, at The National Archives said:
‘The conference aims to focus not only on the Treaty of Versailles, but also on the other treaties that marked the formal end of hostilities: Saint-Germain (Austria), Neuilly (Bulgaria), Trianon (Hungary), Sèvres (Ottoman Empire) and Lausanne (Turkey).
‘We are delighted that, as part of this, the conference will include an exhibition of The National Archives’ unique collection of certified copies of all the treaties, alongside a selection of other materials.’
Submissions are invited for 20-minute papers, or panels of three papers, to be presented on the first day of the conference, on any aspect of the peace making process. Abstracts should be submitted by Saturday 1 December. See full details of the call for papers.
Join the conversation on social media #PeaceConf

(source: H-Diplo)

donderdag 19 juli 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS: Colloque « Dommages de guerre et responsabilité de l’État » (Paris), DEADLINE 25 OCTOBER 2018



Via Hi-D, we learned of a Call for Papers for a colloquium on war damages and state responsibility in the context of the aftermath of World War I.

Colloque organisé par l’Institut d’Histoire du Droit EA 2515 de l’Université Paris Descartes et le CESICE, Centre d’études sur la sécurité internationale et les coopérations européennes de l’Université de Grenoble – Alpes

Décembre 2019 – Conseil d’État, Paris

Organisation :
– Pr Guillaume RICHARD de l’Institut d’Histoire du Droit de l’Université Paris Descartes
– Pr Sébastien LE GAL du CESICE de l’Université de Grenoble – Alpes
Comité scientifique :
– M. Jean BARTHÉLÉMY (avocat honoraire aux Conseils)
– Pr Grégoire BIGOT (Université de Nantes)
– Pr Alain CHATRIOT (Sciences Po Paris)
– Pr Sébastien LE GAL (Université Grenoble Alpes)
– Pr Bernard PACTEAU (Université de Bordeaux)
– Pr Xavier PERROT (Université de Limoges)
– Pr Guillaume RICHARD (Université Paris-Descartes)

Appel à communication à télécharger ICI
Les propositions de communications sont à envoyer à l’adresse suivante avant le 26 octobre 2018 à : guillaume.richard@parisdescartes.fr

PROJET SCIENTIFIQUE

Le centenaire de la loi du 17 avril 1919 sur la réparation des dommages matériels causés par les faits de guerre (la « Charte du sinistré ») offre l’occasion de réfléchir aux relations entre les phénomènes de guerre et de violence collective et la responsabilité de l’État à l’époque contemporaine. La Première Guerre mondiale marque en effet la reconnaissance générale d’une obligation de l’État vis-à-vis des sinistrés ayant subi des dommages physiques ou des destructions sur leurs biens à cause de la guerre. Deux lois, celles du 31 mars 1919 et du 17 avril 1919, indemnisent respectivement les dommages matériels et les dommages physiques subis par les Français, civils ou militaires. Pendant longtemps, l’État avait été tenu irresponsable des faits de guerre : on estimait que ceux-ci résultaient d’un état de nécessité ou correspondaient à des cas de force majeure exonérant de toute responsabilité. Depuis le début du XXe siècle, à l’inverse, un processus continu étend les cas d’indemnisation par l’État des situations de crise ou de violence (guerre, attentats terroristes, émeutes) au nom de la solidarité nationale.

Le colloque s’attachera à questionner l’apparition de la responsabilité de l’État pour la guerre ou les faits liés à une situation de guerre, au sens large, au moment de la Première Guerre mondiale, et ses conséquences ou les formes de sa mise en œuvre. Le colloque entend s’inscrire dans un pan devenu important des études sur la Première Guerre mondiale : celui de la transition entre la guerre et la paix et du retour à la paix. Les recherches se sont multipliées sur les aspects humains de la démobilisation ou de la reconnaissance accordée aux soldats, comme aux victimes civiles ou aux réfugiés. La dimension architecturale ou économique de la reconstruction ou les conférences internationales préparatoires à la signature des traités de paix sont aussi l’objet d’investigations nombreuses. Mais l’indemnisation des dommages de guerre reste un champ d’investigation riche et peu exploité sur le plan juridique.

Il s’agit ainsi d’explorer selon quels principes, avec quels effets juridiques et selon quelles modalités d’indemnisation l’État est tenu responsable des violences de guerre au moment de la Première Guerre mondiale. Le développement de ces mécanismes révèle une tension entre enjeux individuels et collectifs. D’un côté, ils s’inscrivent dans une logique de juridicisation des réparations qui emprunte largement aux mécanismes du droit civil de la responsabilité et reconnaît (en France, mais aussi en Italie ou en Belgique) un droit individuel à réparation ; de l’autre, l’indemnisation est envisagée d’emblée comme la mise en œuvre d’une politique aux effets collectifs, qui engage l’ensemble de la communauté, déterminant par là même des modalités en partie distinctes de la responsabilité civile.
Sans être exhaustives, trois directions paraissent envisageables pour explorer cette tension. Comment peut-on expliquer le passage du principe d’irresponsabilité au principe de responsabilité de l’État au début du XXe siècle ? Comment les mécanismes divers de responsabilité en matière de faits de guerre sont-ils articulés et comment les plans juridique, politique et symbolique des réparations se concilient-ils ou s’opposent-ils ? Comment, enfin, fonctionne l’évaluation et la procédure d’indemnisation et avec quels enjeux ?

1. DE L’IRRESPONSABILITÉ À LA RESPONSABILITÉ

Anciennement, le principe d’irresponsabilité publique pour les dommages aux civils et les destructions domine. La guerre ou les violences, qu’elles soient ou non le fait des autorités publiques, résultent d’un état de nécessité qui les exonère de toute faute ; le déploiement inévitable de la souveraineté étatique excuse l’État (the King can do no wrong). Cela n’empêche pas des mécanismes ponctuels de soutien ou d’assistance, en particulier pour les soldats et les vétérans, ni la réflexion de certains juristes, comme Grotius, en faveur de réparations pour les faits de guerre (De Iure Belli ac Pacis, III, 13). Le début du XXe siècle semble représenter un tournant. Les réflexions se font plus nombreuses pour dégager une responsabilité juridique de l’État, indépendante de la faute et fondée sur la solidarité ou la situation de risque à laquelle sont exposés particulièrement certains habitants.
Il faut ainsi s’interroger sur les raisons ayant conduit à la reconnaissance d’un principe de responsabilité. Comment expliquer le renversement par lequel on passe de l’irresponsabilité de l’État à sa responsabilité ? La Première Guerre mondiale en est-elle le moment pivot ? Même si le principe de responsabilité de l’État avait déjà été proclamé au moment de la Révolution française, il était resté sans réelles suites financières. Plusieurs textes au XIXe siècle réaffirment au contraire l’irresponsabilité de l’État. Des indemnités sont pourtant prévues après la guerre de 1870-1871 par trois lois adoptées entre 1871 et 1874, mais l’attribution se fait de manière hétérogène selon les sinistrés et sans véritable contrôle juridictionnel. Les mécanismes indemnisant tous les sinistrés en 1919 accordent un véritable droit dont le sinistré peut faire contrôler l’application par le juge, à l’inverse du simple « secours » accordé après 1871. Si, en France, les résistances restent limitées à la reconnaissance d’un droit à réparation, non sans controverses violentes sur la portée du droit, d’autres pays, comme l’Angleterre, ne procèdent à aucune reconnaissance générale d’un droit à réparation.

La reconnaissance du droit à réparation est-elle tributaire des conformations du système juridique (systèmes de common law ou de droit écrit) ou de l’intensité des dommages subis ? Le contexte immédiat explique-t-il cette reconnaissance ou faut-il raisonner dans une perspective de plus long terme ? Des expériences de guerre antérieures à la Première Guerre mondiale, anciennes (remontant à la période révolutionnaire) ou plus rapprochées (ainsi la conquête coloniale de la Libye par l’Italie, qui entraîne une première législation sur les dommages de guerre en Italie dès 1913), ont ainsi pu servir de modèle ou de référence. Plus largement, quel rôle les situations de guerre ont pu jouer dans l’extension des cas de responsabilité et le développement d’une responsabilité sans faute de l’État ?
L’apparition de mécanismes semblables de responsabilité a-t-elle également influencé la responsabilité de l’État pour les faits de guerre ? Dès la fin de l’Ancien Régime, des procédures d’indemnisation sont prévues pour certaines catastrophes naturelles, ainsi après des inondations en 1784, plaçant au premier plan le rôle de l’État pour garantir le retour à la normale. La responsabilité publique pour les émeutes fournit un autre exemple significatif: des violences internes sont indemnisées par l’ensemble de la communauté. Le décret du 23 février 1790 ouvre la voie à la responsabilité des communes. Plus tard, la loi du 16 avril 1914, promulguée peu avant le déclenchement de la guerre, transfère partiellement cette responsabilité à l’État, signe d’une monopolisation par l’État des fonctions de solidarité collective. En quoi la guerre renforce la volonté de socialisation ou d’étatisation du risque qui fait de l’État le garant de la sécurité et de l’intégrité physique et matérielle de sa population ?

Il faut enfin s’interroger sur le lien entre la reconnaissance d’une responsabilité liée à la guerre et les enjeux financiers, explicitement mis en avant dans les pays d’Europe de l’Est. Les effets de concurrence de diverses responsabilités jouent aussi leur rôle. Ainsi, en Italie, la réparation de l’État pour les dommages de guerre se heurte aux réticences de certains parlementaires du Mezzogiorno ; ils estiment qu’elle favorisera le Nord, région la plus touchée par les combats, mais aussi la plus riche avant la guerre, alors que la Sicile et la Calabre, touchées par des tremblements de terre à partir de 1908, ne sont toujours pas indemnisées.

La notion de responsabilité sans faute n’est-elle pas finalement trop simple ? Sur le plan strictement juridique, aucune faute ne doit être prouvée pour mettre en jeu la responsabilité ; mais cela ne signifie pas que toute idée de faute ait disparu de l’horizon des réparations. La jurisprudence internationale sur les émeutes le confirme a contrario : si l’État a fait ce qu’il devait pour éviter les dommages, il n’est pas responsable des dommages causés. Il faudrait aussi distinguer une approche juridique (puisque la faute de l’État n’a pas à être prouvée, elle est indifférente) et une approche plus sociale ou politique : l’État indemnise des dommages, car il est en partie, politiquement ou symboliquement, la cause des dommages qui se sont produits, ou parce qu’il est important qu’il se manifeste comme puissance réparatrice vis-à-vis de ses citoyens.

2. L’ARTICULATION DES MÉCANISMES DE RESPONSABILITÉ : PROGRAMME UNITAIRE OU ACCUMULATION HÉTÉROCLITE ?

La responsabilité de l’État face à la guerre se traduit-elle par une réponse unitaire ? Les textes concernant les dommages de guerre, comme la Charte du Sinistré de 1919 en France, ou les législations équivalentes dans les autres pays européens, n’ont jamais couvert tous les cas de responsabilité, ni entraîné la suppression de régimes spécifiques. Les servitudes militaires ou les réquisitions, par exemple, ont fait l’objet de législations spéciales plus précoces, pour reconnaître ou au contraire refuser la réparation par l’État. Dans certains cas, comme au Royaume-Uni, seules certaines situations sont couvertes, sans qu’un principe général de responsabilité de l’État soit reconnu. Cette différenciation peut poser un problème d’égalité entre victimes, couvertes par des régimes différents ; les modes d’évaluation peuvent favoriser telle ou telle catégorie. Elle amène également à distinguer entre la responsabilité pour des faits particuliers et la responsabilité générale du fait de la guerre, sur le plan international, mais aussi interne.

Le principe général de responsabilité a été proclamé à propos de l’Allemagne par l’article 231 du traité de Versailles en 1919. Cette responsabilité générale s’appuie sur un instrument de droit international fondant sa légalité sur de nouveaux outils juridiques. Mais elle peine à faire disparaître le vieux principe du vae victis, selon lequel les vainqueurs pouvaient se payer sur la bête vaincue en espérant ainsi compenser leurs propres pertes. De plus, l’indemnisation internationale se fait souvent au bénéfice des États ou des armées et non des populations. La juridicisation des processus internationaux de réparations au moment de la Première Guerre mondiale, loin d’entraîner une véritable évolution, ne reste-t-elle pas un leurre ? Par ailleurs, quelles relations cette responsabilité internationale des États pour la guerre entretient-elle avec les mécanismes internes prévus par chaque État et avec la réparation individuelle des dommages ? Au moment de la Première Guerre mondiale, la législation des différents États conditionne parfois l’indemnisation des citoyens aux versements effectués par les États vaincus, tandis que d’autres États, comme la France, la Belgique ou l’Italie, affirment que le droit à réparation n’en dépend pas juridiquement (sinon financièrement).

La diversité des mécanismes de réparation attire également l’attention sur un autre enjeu. La responsabilité ou le principe de réparations s’inscrivent-ils seulement dans la perspective du droit à réparation ? Cette réparation, entendue au sens juridique d’une restitutio in integrum, repose sur une approche individuelle, de traitement au cas par cas, qui entre en tension avec une approche plus collective des réparations, comme réponse sociale unitaire à un phénomène exceptionnel. Les conflits juridiques et politiques entre partisans du droit à réparation individuel, qui n’est soumis à aucune obligation, et ceux d’un droit socialisé ou collectif, par lequel l’État peut guider et déterminer la conduite des victimes, révèlent les tensions à l’œuvre entre ces deux approches.

Quel modèle de réparation et quelle conception du droit prédominent au moment de la Première Guerre mondiale ? En quoi, par ailleurs, les débats sur la reconstruction s’inscrivent-ils dans des mouvements plus larges, participant, par exemple, de l’élaboration d’un droit de l’urbanisme avec les lois de 1902 sur l’hygiène et de 1919 et 1924 sur les plans d’extension ? La reconstruction apparaît aussi comme une phase pendant laquelle il devient possible de mettre en œuvre à grande échelle les principes d’hygiène et d’aménagement urbain.

Ces différents éléments permettent d’interroger la dimension politique, mais aussi symbolique ou morale prise en compte dans le processus de réparation. Bien loin d’un simple enjeu juridique, les réparations se voient assigner des fonctions multiples : reconstitution de la cohésion nationale, redémarrage économique, reconstruction des régions détruites, pacification et réconciliation sociale, etc. Dans quelle mesure les mécanismes de responsabilité prévus au moment de la Première Guerre mondiale ont-ils formé un programme cohérent de réparation ou de reconstruction ou simplement un assemblage d’objectifs divers et parfois contradictoires ?

3. DIMENSION TECHNIQUE DE LA RÉPARATION

Si l’on se place dans le cadre de la réparation pécuniaire des dommages, d’autres enjeux apparemment plus techniques permettent d’envisager le principe de justice mis en œuvre par tel régime de responsabilité. On peut indiquer au moins les points suivants :

a/ Délimitation des dommages inclus. La délimitation exacte des dommages ou des personnes couvertes est l’objet de très nombreux ajustements. La guerre n’est pas reconnue en tant que telle comme un phénomène pouvant mettre en jeu de façon générale la responsabilité de l’État : le dommage ne découlant qu’indirectement des faits de guerre n’est ainsi pas indemnisé. Quels sont les dommages dont l’État peut être tenu responsable ou qui sont au contraire exclus de toute réparation ? Comment sont définis la guerre et les faits de guerre dans ces procédures ? Comment le lien avec la guerre ou l’acte de guerre est-il établi ? La définition des dommages passe-t-elle par une liste des différents cas ou par des formules plus générales ? Derrière ces questions techniques apparaît l’étendue même du système de réparation mis en place au moment de la Première Guerre mondiale.

b/ Différence entre évaluation et dédommagement. La mise en jeu de la responsabilité de l’État suppose d’évaluer les dommages. Cette évaluation est individuelle, mais doit se faire dans des conditions similaires pour des dommages très nombreux. L’évaluation est donc fortement standardisée, à l’aide de barèmes et de grilles, loin d’une évaluation individuelle in concreto. Cette standardisation a déterminé des procédures spécifiques (séries de prix de construction utilisées pour les marchés publics, barèmes des assurances) montrant la proximité avec les mécanismes assuranciels ; elle a aussi correspondu à un travail statistique permettant d’évaluer la richesse nationale perdue et qu’il faudrait restaurer. L’évaluation a pu ainsi participer au travail de construction des connaissances de l’État sur son propre territoire et sa population et à la densification des réseaux étatiques, renforçant l’intrication entre connaissance et effets de pouvoir au bénéfice de l’État. En ce sens, la reconnaissance de sa responsabilité par l’État ne participe-t- elle pas paradoxalement de son renforcement ?

L’évaluation elle-même ne débouche pas toujours sur une indemnité, soit parce que le financement des dommages évalués fait défaut, soit parce que l’évaluation concerne des dommages sortant du champ de la réparation, soit enfin parce que ce cadre même n’existe pas encore ou est contesté. C’est le cas des étrangers, exclus d’une législation développée dans la plupart des pays européens au nom de la solidarité nationale, mais aussi plus généralement de certains sinistrés ou de certaines catégories qui protestent contre les restrictions ou retards que l’administration oppose fréquemment aux paiements. L’évaluation sans indemnisation n’est pourtant pas sans but : elle peut être un moyen de faire pression sur les autorités publiques ou de faciliter en amont leur travail (ainsi du travail statistique des comités locaux en France ou en Italie). Il faudra ainsi situer la pratique évaluative non seulement comme une question technique, mais aussi politique (délimitation et valeur de dommages parfois intangibles) et sociale (avec les formes d’organisation collective des sinistrés qui émergent dans l’après-guerre).

c/ Procédure et instances spéciales. La responsabilité de l’État donne souvent lieu à l’adoption de procédures spécifiques et d’instances spéciales chargées de traiter les demandes – quand bien même elles le feraient selon des critères proches du droit ordinaire. La compétence est en général confiée à des instances civiles, qui peuvent agir selon une modalité administrative ou juridictionnelle. Quelles raisons président au choix de tel ou tel mode de résolution ? Peut-on déceler une évolution progressive en faveur de la juridictionnalisation, qui accompagnerait la reconnaissance du droit à réparation ou tout dépend-il de facteurs contextuels ?

Cela doit aussi être l’occasion d’interroger le fonctionnement des instances spéciales mises en place, et notamment des tribunaux des dommages de guerre ou de la Commission supérieure des dommages de guerre, mis en place en France, ou des juridictions spéciales existant dans d’autres pays. Ces instances ont-elles calqué leur fonctionnement sur celui d’un tribunal ou d’une commission administrative ? Quel rôle donnaient-elles à la victime et à l’État ? Apparaissent-elles comme des lieux de pacification (comme le terme de « commissions de conciliation » le suggère en France) ou de confrontation ? Comment leur travail s’articulait-il avec la justice ordinaire, compétente notamment pour le contrôle et la cassation des décisions ?

PROPOSITIONS DE COMMUNICATION

Les propositions de communication s’inscriront dans une perspective destinée à éclairer la reconnaissance du droit à réparation ou sa mise en œuvre au moment de la Première Guerre mondiale. Elles peuvent concerner l’espace français comme européen ou colonial. Elles seront principalement consacrées à l’indemnisation des dommages matériels, mais des communications sur l’indemnisation des dommages physiques permettant d’éclairer le lien entre la responsabilité de l’État et la guerre ou les faits de guerre sont également bienvenues. De même, les communications peuvent s’intéresser à la question de la responsabilité étatique interne ou sur le plan international. Les propositions préciseront quel(s) aspect(s) de l’appel à communication elles entendent en particulier traiter.

Une proposition d’une page maximum doit être envoyée avant le 26 octobre 2018. Les réponses seront données en décembre 2018. Le colloque se tiendra à la fin de l’année 2019 au Conseil d’État à Paris. La date sera précisée ultérieurement.

More information here

(source: ESCLH Blog)

dinsdag 17 juli 2018

BOOK: Sam ERMAN, Almost Citizens: Puerto Rico, the U.S. Constitution, and Empire [Studies in Legal History] (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018). ISBN 9781108415491, £ 39.99



Via the American Society for Legal History, we learned of a new forthcoming book (November 2018) in their “Studies in Legal History” series. The book deals with the US annexation of Puerto Rico in 1898 and the imperial governance issues this created. The book can be pre-ordered here

ABOUT THE BOOK

Almost Citizens lays out the tragic story of how the United States denied Puerto Ricans full citizenship following annexation of the island in 1898. As America became an overseas empire, a handful of remarkable Puerto Ricans debated with US legislators, presidents, judges, and others over who was a citizen and what citizenship meant. This struggle caused a fundamental shift in constitution law: away from the post-Civil War regime of citizenship, rights, and statehood and toward doctrines that accommodated racist imperial governance. Erman's gripping account shows how, in the wake of the Spanish-American War, administrators, lawmakers, and presidents together with judges deployed creativity and ambiguity to transform constitutional meaning for a quarter of a century. The result is a history in which the United States and Latin America, Reconstruction and empire, and law and bureaucracy intertwine.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sam Erman, University of Southern California
Sam Erman is Associate Professor at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction
1. 1898: 'The constitutional lion in the path'
2. The Constitution and the new US expansion: debating the status of the Islands
3. 'We are naturally Americans': Federico Degetau and Santiago Iglesias pursue citizenship
4. 'American aliens': Isabel Gonzalez, Domingo Collazo, Federico Degetau, and the Supreme Court, 1902–1905
5. Reconstructing Puerto Rico, 1904–1909
6. The Jones Act and the long path to collective naturalization
Conclusion.

More information here

(source: ESCLH Blog)