ESIL Interest Group History of International Law

ESIL Interest Group History of International Law

vrijdag 27 januari 2023

ROUNDTABLE REMINDER: "Missing Histories of International Economic Law Adjudication: Extraterritorial Quarters of the Past and the Present", ESIL IG History of International Law - International Economic Law (MSTeams, 31 January 2023)

 

Description: 
Courts operating in ‘extraterritorial quarters’ or districts as dispute resolution mechanisms have been overlooked in international economic law. Whether in the form of courts acting in special zones (e.g., International Zone of Tangier, 1923-1956; Qatar Financial Centre, 2005-present) or the retired common law judges acting in small ‘market-dominant’ jurisdictions, the ‘extraterritorial quarters’ offer unique cases of international economic law adjudication where multiple legal systems collide within one single city.
  
The online roundtable is a joint effort of the European Society of International Law (ESIL)  International Economic Law and History of Internationational Law Interest groups,  together with Ghent University, KU Leuven, and UC Louvain, that will connect researchers from different places working on various ‘extraterritorial quarters’ of the past and the present.

Registration:
https://event.ugent.be/registration/ExtraterritorialQuarters

woensdag 25 januari 2023

JOURNAL: Journal of the History of International Law, Volume 24, Issue 4 (December 2022)

Image source: Brill


Description:

Spotlight Interview 2021

Gilad Ben-Nun, How Jewish Is International Law? (JHIL 2/2021)

Authors: Raphael Schäfer and Maren Körsmeier

Pages: 459–468


Articles

Acquisitive Prescription in Early Modern International Law

Author: Alexander Batson

Pages: 469–499


The Origins of Regional Ideas: International Law, External Legitimization and Latin America’s ‘legalismo’

Author: Nicole Jenne

Pages: 500–532


Disarmament Debates around the 1899 Hague Peace Conference and the 1921–1922 Washington Conference: Community-Oriented Aspirations and Individual Security Concerns

Author: Mika Hayashi

Pages: 533–560


Theorizing the Normative Significance of Critical Histories for International Law

Authors: Damian Cueni and Matthieu Queloz

Pages: 561–587


Book Reviews

Worldmaking after Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination , written by Adom Getachew

Author: Daniel R. Quiroga-Villamarín

Pages: 589–595


The Economic Weapon: The Rise of Sanctions as a Tool of Modern War , written by Nicholas Mulder

Author: Hossein Askari

Pages: 596–600


More information with Brill.

dinsdag 24 januari 2023

BOOK: Richard BOURKE & Quentin SKINNER (eds), "History in the Humanities and Social Sciences"



image source: CUP

Description:

This interdisciplinary volume explores the relationship between history and a range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences: economics, political science, political theory, international relations, sociology, philosophy, law, literature and anthropology. The relevance of historical approaches within these disciplines has shifted over the centuries. Many of them, like law and economics, originally depended on self-consciously historical procedures. These included the marshalling of evidence from past experience, philological techniques and source criticism. Between the late nineteenth and the middle of the twentieth century, the influence of new methods of research, many indebted to models favoured by the natural sciences, such as statistical, analytical or empirical approaches, secured an expanding intellectual authority while the hegemony of historical methods declined in relative terms. In the aftermath of this change, the essays collected in History in the Humanities and Social Sciences reflect from a variety of angles on the relevance of historical concerns to representative disciplines as they are configured today.
  • Illustrates the benefits of an inter-disciplinary approach to research in the humanities and social sciences
  • Engages one of the central debates about the role of historical understanding in the human sciences
  • Showcases the work of leading scholars in the fields of history, politics, literature, economics, anthropology, law, sociology, and philosophy

Table of Contents:

Introduction
1. Law and history, history and law - Michael Lobban
2. History, law, and the rediscovery of social theory - Samuel Moyn
3. The uses of history in the study of international politics - Jennifer Pitts
4. International relations theory and modern international order: the case of refugees - Mira Siegelberg
5. The Delphi syndrome: using history in the social sciences - Stathis Kalyvas and Daniel Fedorowycz
6. Power in narrative and narratives of power in historical sociology - Hazem Kandil
7. History and normativity in political theory: the case of Rawls - Richard Bourke
8. Political philosophy and the uses of history - Quentin Skinner
9. The relationship between philosophy and its history - Susan James
10. When reason does not see you: feminism at the intersection of history and philosophy - Hannah Dawson
11. On (lost and found) analytical history in political science - Ira Katznelson
12. Making history: poetry and prosopopoeia - Cathy Shrank
13. Reloading the British Romantic canon: the historical editing of literary texts - Pamela Clemit
14. Economics and history: analysing serfdom -Sheilagh Ogilvie
15. The return of depression economics: Paul Krugman and the 21st-century crisis of American democracy - Adam Tooze
16. Anthropology and the turn to history - Joel Isaac.

More information with CUP.

maandag 23 januari 2023

BOOK: Markus BEHAM, "Atrocity Labelling: From Crimes Against Humanity to Genocide Studies" (Bloomsbury, 2022)

Image source: Bloomsbury

Description:

Atrocity. Genocide. War crime. Crime Against Humanity. Such atrocity labels have been popularized among international lawmakers but with little insight offered into how and when these terms are applied and to what effect. What constitutes an event to be termed a genocide or war crime and what role does this play in the application of legal proceedings?

Markus P. Beham, through an interdisciplinary and comparative approach, unpicks these terms to uncover their historical genesis and their implications for international criminal law initiatives concerned with atrocity. The book uniquely compares four specific case studies: Belgian colonial exploitation of the Congo, atrocities committed against the Herero and Nama in German South-West Africa, the Armenian genocide and the man-made Ukrainian famine of the 1930s. Encompassing international law, legal history, and discourse analysis, the concept of 'atrocity labelling' is used to capture the meaning underlying the work of international lawyers and prosecutors, historians and sociologists, agenda setters and policy makers.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction

2. From 'Crimes Against Humanity' to 'Genocide Studies'

3. Labelling Colonialism

4. Labelling Transformation

5. Conclusion

Index


More information with the publisher.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS (Reminder): "TWAIL Summer Academy 2023: Democratizing International Law" (DEADLINE: 29 January 2023)


Image source: TWAILR
TWAIL 2023: Democratizing International Law
Summer Academy – Call for Applications
Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia, 17-21 July 2023

Applications are invited for the inaugural TWAIL Summer Academy taking place from 17 to 21 July 2023 at the Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia. Third World Approaches to International Law (TWAIL) is a movement encompassing scholars and practitioners of international law and policy who are concerned with issues related to the Global South. The scholarly agendas associated with TWAIL are diverse, but the general theme of its interventions is to unpack the colonial legacies of international law and engage in decolonizing efforts.
The Academy will unite international law scholars and practitioners from across the globe in Bogotá to address some of the most pressing global challenges of our time: conflict, mass displacement, economic inequality, and environmental injustice, all of which have disproportionate impact across the global South and particular significance for Colombia. This Academy is part of a growing number of TWAIL initiatives working together to democratize international law. The Academy will consist of lectures, discussions and writing workshops where emerging scholars, graduate students, and legal practitioners have the opportunity to learn about the TWAIL movement, share their unique perspectives, and receive feedback on scholarly projects through writing workshops. It provides an opportunity for productive collaborative exchange amongst participants from across the Global South and North and leading TWAIL scholars from around the world.
The Academy is organized under the auspices of the TWAIL Review (TWAILR) and hosted by the Universidad de los Andes Faculty of Law in partnership with the University of Windsor Faculty of Law and Maynooth University School of Law & Criminology, with the support of the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) and Afronomicslaw. The objectives of the Academy are three-fold:
1. To provide participants the opportunity to share Third Worldist perspectives rooted in histories of colonialism and imperialism, and the uses of TWAIL for more effective knowledge production, policymaking, and teaching across the Global South and beyond.
2. To build solidarity and connection among junior and senior scholars across the Global South and North, with particular attention to the Latin American scholarly community, especially those left out of knowledge mobilization activities due to financial resources.
3. To create opportunity for scholars from the Global South to produce innovative knowledge freely accessible around the world.
With these goals in mind, all applicants must submit an abstract for a paper that will be considered for publication in the TWAIL Review or Afronomicslaw. The Academy’s writing workshops will be a space to test out your ideas and receive feedback. All Summer Academy activities will be conducted in English, but we have some capacity in Spanish. We welcome applicants from all over the world and priority will be given to applicants from the Global South. If you are an applicant from the Global South that requires funding support for your travel and accommodation, please let us know. We ask those seeking funding to be reflexive and set out their location and subject position.
Applicants must submit:
– An abstract (maximum 250 words) in English that is relevant to the Academy’s themes.
– letter of interest (maximum one page) in English or Spanish setting out any funding needs and how the Academy will enhance your scholarship, practice, and praxis.
– Short current CV.
– The names and email addresses of 2 referees.
Please submit applications to TWAILR.SummerSchool@gmail.com by 29 January 2023.

vrijdag 6 januari 2023

ROUNDTABLE CONFERENCE: "Missing Histories of International Economic Law Adjudication: Extraterritorial Quarters of the Past and the Present", ESIL IG History of International Law - International Economic Law (MSTeams, 31 January 2023)

Description: 
Courts operating in ‘extraterritorial quarters’ or districts as dispute resolution mechanisms have been overlooked in international economic law. Whether in the form of courts acting in special zones (e.g., International Zone of Tangier, 1923-1956; Qatar Financial Centre, 2005-present) or the retired common law judges acting in small ‘market-dominant’ jurisdictions, the ‘extraterritorial quarters’ offer unique cases of international economic law adjudication where multiple legal systems collide within one single city.
  
The online roundtable is a joint effort of the European Society of International Law (ESIL)  International Economic Law and History of Internationational Law Interest groups,  together with Ghent University, KU Leuven, and UC Louvain, that will connect researchers from different places working on various ‘extraterritorial quarters’ of the past and the present.

Registration:
https://event.ugent.be/registration/ExtraterritorialQuarters

BOOK: Miriam Bak MCKENNA, "Reckoning with Empire: Self-Determination in International Law" (Brill, 2023)

Image source: Brill

Description: 
The book adopts a new approach to self-determination’s international legal history, tracing the ways in which various actors have sought to reinvent self-determination in different juridical, political, and economic iterations to create the conditions for global transformation. The value of the book’s approach lies not only in a more nuanced understanding of self-determination’s legal history, but in excavating the multiple ways in which actors, particularly those from the Global South, have challenged the existing normative and legal structures which rendered them unequal under the European system of international law. Rethinking this process touches on issues that are relevant not only to debates about the enduring legacy of imperialism in our present, but also to contemporary discussions of the position self-determination has come to occupy in international law.

Table of contents:

Introduction
Pages: 1–25

Chapter 1 Self-Determination: Hierarchies of Empire
Pages: 26–46

Chapter 2 Renegotiating Sovereignty in the Interwar Period
Pages: 47–73

Chapter 3 “One World” - Anticolonialism at the UN
Pages: 74–107

Chapter 4 Remaking the World after Empire
Pages: 108–137

Chapter 5 Sovereignty and Self-Determination at the End of History
Pages: 138–168

Epilogue Contesting Sovereignty
Pages: 169–177

                                                        More information can be found on the publisher's website.